"It is only as an esthetic phenomenon that existence and the world appear justified."
[VIDEO]

Almost Like the Blues

I saw some people starving
There was murder, there was rape
Their villages were burning
They were trying to escape
I couldn’t meet their glances
I was staring at my shoes
It was acid, it was tragic
It was almost like the blues

I have to die a little
Between each murderous thought
And when I’m finished thinking
I have to die a lot
There’s torture and there’s killing
There’s all my bad reviews
The war, the children missing
Lord, it’s almost like the blues

I let my heart get frozen
To keep away the rot
My father said I’m chosen
My mother said I’m not
I listened to their story
Of the Gypsies and the Jews
It was good, it wasn’t boring
It was almost like the blues

There is no G-d in heaven
And there is no Hell below
So says the great professor
Of all there is to know
But I’ve had the invitation
That a sinner can’t refuse
And it’s almost like salvation
It’s almost like the blues

Leonard Cohen

[QUOTE]
The human being’s mastery of itself, on which the self is founded, practically always involves the annihilation of the subject in whose service that mastery is maintained, because the substance which is mastered, suppressed, and disintegrated by self-preservation is nothing other than the living entity, of which the achievements of self-preservation can only be defined as functions – in other words, self-preservation destroys the very thing which is to be preserved.
— Theodore W. Adorno and Max Horkheimer | Dialectic of Enlightenment: Philosophical Fragments
[PHOTO]
Givenchy F/W 2014 RTW

Givenchy F/W 2014 RTW

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In the English-speaking world the middle classes came into power early in the nineteenth century and gained control over the theatre. They were pious, law-abiding, and industrious. They were assured of eternal life in the next world and, in this, they were squarely seated on Property and the privileges that accompany it. They were attended by devoted servants who knew their place. They were benevolent within certain limits, but chose to ignore wide tracts of injustice and stupidity in the world about them; and they shrank from contemplating those elements within themselves that were ridiculous, shallow, and harmful. They distrusted the passions and tried to deny them. Their questions about the nature of life seemed to be sufficiently answered by the demonstration of financial status and by conformity to some clearly established rules of decorum. These were precarious positions; abysses yawned on either side. The air was loud with questions that must not be asked.
Three Plays | Thorton Wilder
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Most types of material consumption are strongly habit-forming…After an initial period of excitement, the average consumer grows accustomed to what he has purchased and…rapidly aspires to own the next product in line.
Revisiting Keynes: Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren | Gary Becker and Luis Rayo
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[PHOTO]

photographed by alexandra utzmann for leonard paris, le jour d’avant: cr fashion book

photographed by alexandra utzmann for leonard paris, le jour d’avant: cr fashion book

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[QUOTE]
I understand, all right. The hopeless dream of being - not seeming, but being. At every waking moment, alert. The gulf between what you are with others and what you are alone. The vertigo and the constant hunger to be exposed, to be seen through, perhaps even wiped out. Every inflection and every gesture a lie, every smile a grimace. Suicide? No, too vulgar. But you can refuse to move, refuse to talk, so that you don’t have to lie. You can shut yourself in. Then you needn’t play any parts or make wrong gestures. Or so you thought. But reality is diabolical. Your hiding place isn’t watertight. Life trickles in from the outside, and you’re forced to react. No one asks if it is true or false, if you’re genuine or just a sham. Such things matter only in the theatre, and hardly there either. I understand why you don’t speak, why you don’t move, why you’ve created a part for yourself out of apathy. I understand. I admire. You should go on with this part until it is played out, until it loses interest for you. Then you can leave it, just as you’ve left your other parts one by one.
Persona | Ingmar Bergman
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[QUOTE]

The girl stood up and walked to the end of the station. Across, on the other side, were fields of grain and trees along the banks of the Ebro. Far away, beyond the river, were mountains. The shadow of a cloud moved across the field of grain and she saw the river through the trees.

'And we could have all this,' she said. 'And we could have everything and every day we make it more impossible.'

— "Hills Like White Elephants" | Ernest Hemingway
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[PHOTO]
Teatro ph. Steven Meisel feat. Amber Valletta Vogue Italia Sept 2001

Teatro ph. Steven Meisel 
feat. Amber Valletta 
Vogue Italia Sept 2001

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[QUOTE]
Human beings are unable to be honest with themselves about themselves. They cannot talk about themselves without embellishing. This script portrays such human beings — the kind who cannot survive without lies to make them feel they are better people than they really are. It even shows this sinful need for flattering falsehood goes beyond the grave — even the character who dies cannot give up his lies when he speaks to the living through a medium. Egoism is a sin the human being carries with him from birth; it is the most difficult to redeem. This film is like a strange picture scroll that is unrolled and displayed by the ego. You say that you can’t understand this script at all, but that is because the human heart itself is impossible to understand.
— Akira Kurosawa on Rashomon from Something Like an Autobiography
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[QUOTE]
Love is not vain because it is frustrated, but because it is fulfilled. The people we love turn to ashes when we possess them.
Remembrance of Things Past: Vol II | Marcel Proust
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Theyskens’ Theory | Fall 13

Theyskens’ Theory | Fall 13